DSL Splitter at the Hub


In the diagrams on this page,
  • pair 1 (wht/blu) = "voice" connections for line one
  • pair 2 (wht/org) = "voice" connections for line two (if present)
  • pair 3 (wht/grn) = DSL data connections
  • pair 4 (wht/brn) = line connection from the NID to the splitter
Where possible, I would recommend actually using the pairs shown for the purposes indicated. That should minimize the need for rewiring jacks to complete your DSL installation and will make it as simple as possible if it is necessary to remove DSL service in the future.

Where "DSL" appears on this page, it always refers to ADSL.


DSL Splitter Installation in a Star Topology

If you have a star topology, installing DSL should be very easy if you place your splitter at the same location as your hub/junction. If you are using a 66 block or some other hub device which allows easy reconfiguration of connections and your cables are CAT3 or higher, you may be able to complete your installation in just a few minutes. Ideally, you should be able to complete your installation by simply connecting the splitter to your junction device, changing the cross-connects, changing the jack at a location suitable for your DSL modem/router where where you already have a CAT3 cable connected to the hub/junction, and changing the connection in the NID. If your junction device is a bus-strip with screw terminals or some other device that doesn't allow for easy reconfiguration of connections, this may be the perfect time to switch to a more suitable device.

Note:  If you have an alarm system, special factors need to be considered while planning for your DSL splitter installation.   Even if you have a star topology, you may find it preferable to use a splitter located near the NID, so that you only need to make minor changes to the connections to the RJ 31X jack.  Refer to "Installing A DSL Splitter With An Alarm System".


View a photo
of an actual 66 block
configured as shown
at "Wiring Block Techniques and Tips".
At the right is an illustration of an example 66-block arranged for a DSL installation. The exact arrangement of your block would vary according to your particular installation, but would be similar to this example. Here are the connections shown on the example:
  • The cable coming from the NID is terminated on binding post pairs 1-4
    • Pair 1 is unused. (Would have been line one before DSL was installed.)
    • Pair 2 is line 2 (if present).
    • Pair 3 is unused.
    • Pair 4 is the DSL line - by using pair 4 for the DSL line, you can keep your phone line working while you install the splitter by leaving pair 1 connected from the NID to the station cables until you're ready to cutover to the splitter. When you're ready to cutover, you'd just change from pair 1 to pair 4 in the NID and change the cross-connects for line 1 on the block.
  • The cable to the splitter is terminated on the opposite side of the block on binding post pairs 26-29. I chose this location because it was easy to draw. You could terminate the splitter cable on the next four pairs available on your block. You could choose pairs 45-49 at the end of the block and leave space to add more station cables consecutive to your existing cables. If you're installing a new 66-block, you would probably terminate the splitter cable on pairs 5-8. There's no right or wrong choice. It's just a matter of preference. Just remember to document what you do so that you can work on it in the future without having to figure out what is where.
    • The DSL line is cross-connected from pair 4 of the NID cable to pair 4 of the splitter cable. This pair would terminate on the "LINE" connection on the splitter.
    • Pair 3 of the splitter cable would terminate on the "DSL" or "DATA" connection on the splitter. On the 66-block, pair 3 is cross-connected to the cable going to the location where the DSL modem/router will be located.
    • Pair 1 of the splitter cable would terminate on the "VOICE" connection on the splitter. On the 66-block, pair 1 is cross-connected to the first pair of all the station cables to connect telephone line 1.
    • If you have two telephone lines and want the DSL line to be on "line two", use pair 2 for the "VOICE" connections instead of pair 1.
  • In the illustration, the cable on pairs 5-8 is used for the location for the DSL modem/router.
    • Pairs 1 and 2 would go to a jack for connection of a telephone.
    • Pair 3 would go to a jack for connection to the DSL modem/router.

    • (A dual jack faceplate could be used so that both jacks fit in the existing space.)
  • Pair 1 of all the station cables are all cross-connected to the "VOICE" on pair 1 of the splitter cable. Pair 2 of all the station cables are all cross-connected to pair 2 of the cable coming from the NID to provide connection to a second phone line. If your DSL line is "line two", this would be adjusted accordingly. I would recommend installing the cross-connect for the second line even if you only have one line. This will make it simpler and avoid confusion if a second line is added in the future.
If you have more than 10 station cables, you'll need two 66-blocks or a 100 pair 110-block to support up to 22 station cables. The illustration below shows a 110-block configuration for 15 station cables similar to the above 66-block illustrated above. You'll also want to see the information about 110-block installation at "Wiring Block Techniques and Tips".
If you have a star topology, you also have several other options for the location and type of splitter to install. You could locate the splitter near the modem/router or you could locate the splitter near the NID.



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